The new President of the Nigerian Bar Association, Mr. Okey Wali, SAN, on Wednesday refrained from commenting on the travails of the suspended President of the Court of Appeal, Justice Ayo Salami, noting that the matter is sub-judice. punch nigeria  reports.

Wali spoke on a number of issues at a news conference in Abuja.

Although he noted that the Salami affair was sub-judice, Wali also said he would consult his predecessor concerning the NBA’s position on the matter.

Asked his position on the matter, which caused disaffection between the NBA and the National Judicial Council during the leadership of his predecessor, Joseph Daudu, SAN, Wali said, “I want to be fully briefed by the presidency that I have taken over from.”

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Continuing, he said, “In the best traditions of our profession, when a matter is in court, it is sub-judice and we don’t talk to the press about it. So I wouldn’t want to comment on it.”

Wali, also, refrained from commenting on Daudu’s claims that some senior lawyers, as well as eminent retired justices, served as conduits between politicians and trial courts in election cases.

Wali said, “I didn’t hear that so I wouldn’t comment on that.”

Daudu made the allegation at a valedictory session in honour of late Justice Anthony Aniagolu at the Supreme Court on February 17, 2012.

Wali, however, stressed that his presidency would focus on strengthening professionalism in legal practice in the country.

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He said special attention would be placed on promoting the ethics of the profession.

Wali said, “The main focus would be professionalising the NBA.

“The greatest asset of any legal practitioner will be his integrity. We seem to have some issues with that.

“The decadence in the society appear to be seeping into the legal profession.”

Noting that the lawyers are products of the society, including the institutions of learning, Wali said problems in the general society were “gradually” seeping into the profession


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